Author: paris-bistro

With more than a century of history, les Noces de Jeanette is not a simple restaurant but an institution. Inside, the décor evokes the story of the Opéra Comique. Originally known as Poccardi, the restaurant then took the name of ‘Les Noces de Jeannette’ [‘Jeannette’s Wedding’] after a one-act opéra comique by Victor Massé, which premiered in 1853. The opera was performed as a curtain raiser 1400 times in the Salle Favart, just across the road. With its five rooms, Les Noces de Jeannette can host business lunches, romantic meals for two or family dinners, as well as private, family…

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What would Paris and France be without its many colourful bistros and terrace cafés? They give uniqueness to the city and are major elements of French life, romance and pleasure. It is the experience of uniqueness and character of each city that is under threat. The bistros and sidewalk cafés of France are threatened by the standardization of the world. Today, the city centers of the big metropoliseis tend to be very similar. Everywhere, the same signs, logos,  fast-food chains and take-away shops with identical decoration and comparable atmospheres.  But cafés are unique places that identify a destination. Paris and France are still slightly spared by…

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History, pleasure and fun. Stories of artists, writers like Henry Miller and of all kinds of personalities, people that came for a meal or a drink at Wepler’s to find the atmosphere of this typical Parisian Brasserie. For more over a hundred years the Wepler, the largest oyster house in Paris, has brought happiness to the connoisseurs of fresh and quality food. Located between Montmartre and Pigalle, this brasserie remains a must to Paris lovers. The Brasserie Wepler celebrated its 100 years in 1992. Through the century, Wepler has witnessed the evolution of its neighborhood, of the surrounding cabarets, of…

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In front of the Montparnasse Tower, a Bouillon Chartier replaced the old 1900 Montparnasse restaurant. It is not a creation but a renaissance of the address, 116 years after its first inauguration by Edouard Chartier. On his benches, Modigliani must have certainly drink absinthes… It is a miracle that this restaurant is so well preserved. It belongs to the category of Bouillons. They are not bistros but popular Parisian restaurants originally intended for employees and renowned for their very good value for money. The first was created in 1860 by Alexandre Duval, where only broths were served. Thus, those nostalgic…

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Vladimir Putin has just authorized an amendment to the liquor law which reserves the exclusive use of the term “champagne” to Russian producers. French Champagne producers will be able to keep the word Champagne in Latin but therefore have to change the labels to Cyrillic for the appellation “bubbly wines” when importing to Russia. The Russian president is following in the footsteps of Stalin, because it was indeed, under “the Father of Nations”, as Stalin was nicknamed, that the Soviet champagne Sovetskoye champanskoye was launched. The sparkling wine technique produced in the former USSR was developed in 1928, created from aligoté…

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One thing is certain, the Covid will have demonstrated something that seemed so natural that we did not talk about it: the attachment of Parisians to the terraces of theirs cafes and bistros.Because since May 19, first phase of a progressive reopening, Parisians have flocked to the terraces. At the moment, the cafes are limite to no more than 50% of their customers in their terraces. To compensate for the loss of revenue, thethe municipality has authorized cafes and restaurants to expand and install ephemeral terraces, on parking spaces instead of cars. So the streets are filled with terraces that…

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A restaurant doesn’t become a legend by accident, and it certainly can’t stay that way by resting on its laurels. Chartier is over 100 years old and still in the very prime of life. The restaurant is dear to native Parisians, which might help explain why it is just as beloved by tourists from the world over. In 1896, the Bouillon Chartier was born out of a very simple concept – provide a decent meal at a reasonable price and give customers good service in order to earn their loyalty. 50 million meals, and only four owners later, the recipe…

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The place positively brims with life and the goodness of the produce of French soil, run by a team of engaging men and women. It brims with life, and yet it has never changed course, as immutable as the decor, which dates back to the Belle Epoque, or the menu with its timeless classics. Sébillon is an institution around Porte Maillot. Some of the gourmets here have been loyal to the house for over 50 years. One such is Gérard, a businessman who has been coming here since 1947. “When people talk to me about Sébillon, I think of General…

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The Mouton Blanc? The name evokes an age-old French gastronomic tradition. And age-old is no exaggeration when speaking of this restaurant, one of the oldest in Paris, where the sumptuous odours of traditional cuisine mix with the scent of history and literature. Molière, Racine, Boileau, Chapelle and La Fontaine dined there, sometimes in the company of the famous French tragic actress Champmeslé and Ninon de Lenclos. The latter, a woman of letters and wit, most likely came here to partake in the epicurean pleasures she held dear. Of course, the décor has changed somewhat since those times. The Mouton…

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The attempt by the Government to provide universal equality with retirement age and pension entitlements has led to wide spread havoc brought about by transport disruption. The strike of train and metro drivers has deadlocked Paris and its region since December 5th. The government’s plan to set up a universal retirement system for all French people is a declaration of downright war from the metro and train drivers. Presently they reach retirement at the age of 52 whereas others at 63. 1995 marked the last major strike in Paris which was launched for the very same reason. But, it had…

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